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Departamento de Estado de los EEUU, 21-08-1911, p. 21

19 The sad example of the trusts established in the United States show that capitalists are heartless, even where the welfare of their own countrymen is concerned. Once in their clutches, Central America would become, sooner or later, what Costa Rica is now on account of its concessions to the United Fruit Company, but as already stated economic...

Departamento de Estado de los EEUU, 21-08-1911, p. 22

20 Nicaragua, than that of introducing corporations, since in the United States themselves the government is now endeavoring to cure the body politic of the terrible trustcancer from which it is now suffering and by reason of which the United States are presenting, indisputably, the greatest symptom of decadence which this great nation häs as ye...

Departamento de Estado de los EEUU, 21-08-1911, p. 23

21 forced upon Honduras, the United States could have prevented it; and after the outrage of the Momotombo against Acajutla, the United States was obliged, with the consent of the other Central American governments, to demand the retirement of Zelaya, as his government was harmful to civilization and to the interests of the United States as well...

Departamento de Estado de los EEUU, 21-08-1911, p. 24

22 not promptly paid, refused to supply the wants of the Nicaraguan dictator and of his favorite. Then Zelaya caused the appointment of an Arbitration board, in accordance with the penal stipulation of the contract, claiming from Emery double the value of the goods furnished. Gamez sent his nephew to Bluefields as attorney for the Nicaraguan gov...

Departamento de Estado de los EEUU, 21-08-1911, p. 25

23 nor yet the Nicaraguan lawyer who after the lapse of the three years demanded the forfeiture of the contract, who is now a judge in the supreme court of Managua, and who received 10, 000 silver in payment for those services which were so ruinous to the country. There is no doubt that these crimes should be punished. The Emery claim was just a...

Departamento de Estado de los EEUU, 21-08-1911, p. 26

24 For this reason it is of the utmost necessity to bring the facts to the knowledge of the people of the United States, and to inform them of the true social and political conditions of Nicaragua. These truths show that the evil lies in the venality of the politicians of Central America, not in the patience of the people in supporting them, for...

Departamento de Estado de los EEUU, 21-08-1911, p. 27

25 Speaking generally, an aversion to truth is another singular characteristic of Latin society. Let the Saxon, then, teach us to keep the plighted word, by example and education. This teaching will not be understood by the older generations, but will be absorbed by the children, and it is these that represent the future. Institutions like the C...

Departamento de Estado de los EEUU, 21-08-1911, p. 28

26 ministers in the capitals of Central America, had been devoted to the creation of the Pedagogic Institution, Central America would already enjoy the prospect of true civilization, provided the American Government would but furnish teachers, tools and materials for teaching. In the discussions of the Central American congress held at Washingto...

Departamento de Estado de los EEUU, 21-08-1911, p. 29

  • Fecha: 21-8-1911
  • Página: 29
  • País: US
  • Etiquetas: Anarchism
27 The obligations and duties which one nation contracts always draw after them reciprocal duties. The Monroe Doctrine, now universally recognized as il principle of the United States Government, has imposed upon this nation a multitude of obligations which continually occasion it difficulties and dangers. The republics of Central America llave ...

Departamento de Estado de los EEUU, 21-08-1911, p. 30

28 Zelaya had involved the country to an astounding degree with contractors and companies, English, French, German, Italian and United States. The first act of justice performed by the Government at Washington, in this respect, was the grading of all of these contracts, both European and North American. It refused to favor its own citizens in an...

Departamento de Estado de los EEUU, 21-08-1911, p. 31

29 States. Have we the right to deny to the United States the right of intervention in our internal affairs? By no means. But we have the right, the supremely human right, based upon civilization, to ask, nay, even to demand, that the Nicaraguan Government shall be a government of legality and order, and that in no case shall the United States s...

Departamento de Estado de los EEUU, 21-08-1911, p. 32

30 government in Central America is more and more urgent, so that immigrants may have proper guarantees for life and property, and so that the United States may not be continually obliged to intervene, and even to defend the territory of Central America, by reason of the duties. springing from the Monroe Doctrine. The American Government, howeve...

Departamento de Estado de los EEUU, 21-08-1911, p. 33

31 While the new generations are receiving education, the United States could assist and direct Central America along the lines and in the practices advocated by the genius of Washington, the greatest of North Americans; that is to say, in the selection of men. The Father of his Country always sought out the most honorable men. The law of select...

Departamento de Estado de los EEUU, 21-08-1911, p. 34

32 sublime maxim attributed to our Saviour: Do unto others as you would have them do unto you. The people of the United States and their lawful representative, the Government, are therefore under the imperative obligation to do in Nicaragua as they would have others do unto them. If, in this country, justice is administered, wise laws exist and ...

Departamento de Estado de los EEUU, 21-08-1911, p. 35

33 that the government should be in the hands of the best element, proper selection having been made from among those best fitted for the work. This was the practice of the first president of this great country. Selection was Washington advice; and it was also that of Franklin. It is necessary to select men, to select all the time, and to teach ...

Departamento de Estado de los EEUU, 21-08-1911, p. 36

34 each country, all of them beginning under eight years of age, so that they would enter the establishment uncontaminated by any fixed vices. Some place in the United States should be selected for this institution, because the environment would educate better than all else. The future teachers of Central America would be reared in the midst of ...

Departamento de Estado de los EEUU, 21-08-1911, p. 37

35 sheltered vales of Central America where the farmer hand is so sadly needed. This would be a method of conquest and expansion never dreamt of in past ages. Could anything grander and at the same time more practical be desired? Would this be a Utopia. From the various important points on that great railway, branches built by each Central Ameri...

Departamento de Estado de los EEUU, 21-08-1911, p. 38

36 character, having acquaintance with our nationalities, and free from all immoderate or unlawful ambitions in a word, men of recognized probity of character. Just because the social conditions of the Central American nations is so difficult, it is not everyone who could serve as an intermediary between those nations and the government of the U...

Departamento de Estado de los EEUU, 21-08-1911, p. 39

37 concessions, monopolies, and land and mine grabbing operations, always availed themselves of the instrumentality of foreigners. Corruption contaminated the bones of both. Inordinate love of wealth is an infirmity and a symptom of death. Rome succumbed amid the splendors of Petronius and the luxuries of Luculus. Anthony forgot his country in t...

Departamento de Estado de los EEUU, 21-08-1911, p. 40

38 nations had their birth and growth on the banks of large rivers and by the shores of the sea. Egypt on the banks of the Nile, whose periodic inundations suggested great works and monuments; Greece, with its shores bathed by the waters of the Mediterranean; Rome built upon the Tiber; Constantinople on the Bosphorus; Paris, with open navigation...